Passively Sticking Up for Myself

My new communities have very active teachers and school administrators, even in preschools and daycares. I’ve been asked to participate in or host events for classes at least a dozen times now and have always found a way to make it work (because accomodating, say, three classes in a day is hard work for just one person in a small library). I LOVE that I have this kind of support and interest, because I’ve worked in a few other places where this relationship does not exist and I had to fight my way into the lives of students.

But, then, sometimes it’s not so wonderful. Like when preschool teachers keep demanding your theme for a storytime that’s a month away. I know that it’s because in order to bring the kids, they have to prove that it’s a learning experience that can be tied into their curriculum. However, I have a demanding work schedule and as a result, I only plan storytimes 2-3 weeks ahead. This makes no sense to teachers, of course. I usually feel like an enormous disappointment when I can’t give them a definite answer and defer to them on what they’d like me to do.

More than feeling like a disappointment, though, I really feel defensive. EVERY storytime is worthwhile, no matter the theme. In every storytime I include concepts and new vocabulary, fun songs and dancing that encourage motor skills, practices that help them prepare for the social rules of school, and so much more.

So I thought, why not make it easy for every teacher and administrator to see this? Why not be my own advocate?

I made an envelope-sized flyer to send to my local preschools and daycares that shared just what storytime is all about and all of my summer themes, as well. This way, they have the information at hand and I’m not wondering if I’m being too defensive by insisting in person that they come no matter what.

ImageOn the front is a very simple breakdown of ECRR2 and the benefits of storytime.

ImageThe back has a schedule and I added contact information at the bottom.

Easy peasy lemon squeezey.

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